Valerie Gommon Midwife’s Blog

So you want to be a midwife?

Posted on: January 1, 2009

When out and about doing promotional work for my Independent Midwifery Practice www.3shiresmidwife.co.uk I am often asked what is involved to become a midwife.  It is obviously a profession that many women are called to; for some it is just a whim, they have a baby and think that it is such a wonderful job that they might have a go, but for others it becomes a serious intent.

Midwifery is not just about “delivering” or facilitating a birth.  Midwives are often the first person a pregnant woman will see; we give information and support throughout the pregnancy, labour and birth and postnatal period; we help mothers make informed choices about the services and options available.

The role of the midwife is very diverse; we undertake clinical examinations, provides health and parent education and support the family through pregnancy, birth and early parenting.  We also work in partnership with other health and social care services and midwives are responsible for their own individual practice and have a statutory responsibility to keep up to date with current knowledge.

I have had four children, three born at home and I read voraciously and set about informing myself to achieve my homebirths at a time when homebirth was definitely discouraged.  Having successfully achieved (challenging) but wonderful births at home I have to admit that I did become slightly evangelical about birth and homebirth and wanted other women to feel the same empowerment that I felt.

I was fortunate to have a midwife friend and I began teaching birth preparation classes alongside her, eventually teaching myself, never really thinking that I would be a midwife.  To be honest, I thought I knew too much; I didn’t think that I could bear three years of training to teach me something I already knew!

Time moved on, and I decided that I did want to be a midwife.  It was a long process.  I needed to undertake some up-to-date studying as it had been sometimes since my O levels.  I honestly don’t remember now how long it took, but it was certainly several years – I did an A level, I did an aptitude test, I applied, was rejected, waited a year and applied again (may even have been rejected again), the selection process was hard.  I think 250 applicants for 12 places.  They asked me what I thought were really stupid questions, really difficult questions.  I thought they were mad to turn me down; I was committed, knowledgeable and knew that I would make a good midwife!  Eventually I got lucky and gained a place to study.

The course itself was challenging.  A roller-coaster of a ride; highs and lows; lack of self-belief; difficult things to encounter and teachers that I disagreed with – but three years later I did it, I emerged as a brand new midwife and guess what, I did need those three years (and more) to become a midwife!

The process of applying for midwifery training has changed somewhat since I did my training.  Training is now a University Degree course; usually 3 years unless you are already a Registered Nurse and the minimum requirement to train is two A levels, science subjects are preferred. NVQ/SVQ Level 3, the BTEC National Diploma, or equivalent access to higher education programmes run by colleges of further education, are alternatives. Application is through UCAS www.ucas.ac.uk and you will gain a degree and Registered Midwife qualification.

It is important that you carefully check the financial status of being a student midwife.  The situation is under review, but some recent students have been unable to claim any financial support whilst training and have completed their training in considerable debt.  You will also be expected to attend University and work as a Student Midwife in a clinical setting, this will include shift-work and unsocial hours.  There will be many moans and groans along the way, it is not an easy job – it is challenging and exhausting, you will have to deal with staffing shortages and bureaucracy, but it is still the best job in the world!

More information about midwifery training can be found at:

www.nmc-uk.org/aArticle.aspx?ArticleID=2100

www.rcm.org.uk/jobs-and-careers/becoming-a-midwife/

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