Valerie Gommon Midwife’s Blog

Archive for the ‘Cathy Warwick’ Category

On Thursday 20th September women (and men) around the world will be hosting film screenings to raise the profile of midwifery.  I am joining this event because I passionately believe that women are entitled to better maternity care.

Everyone in the UK knows that our maternity services are in crisis and indeed the Royal College of Midwives has strongly stated this.

I am planning to take a break from midwifery as I am totally burnt out … this is partly the demands of being on-call 24/7 for the past 8 years, but it is also due to the increasing scrutiny, red tape  and pressures on midwives.  I believe that most midwives do their very best for women.  Of course there are some rouge practitioners and the public needs to be protected against them, but the pressures on midwives are immense; more paperwork, more investigations of our practice, pressures of working with a system that is barely fit for purpose ….

At the same time Independent Midwifery, which gives “gold standard” care is set to become illegal unless an eleventh hour solution can be found to provide us with Professional Indemnity Insurance which will become mandatory from October 2013.

What will happen to these highly skilled midwives and the clients they currently care for?  I’m afraid that I feel ground down and beaten by all that is currently happening in midwifery … it is so sad, midwifery and childbirth has been my passion and my life for the past 20 years!

So, as my swan song to midwifery (for now at least) I am hosting this film showing in Milton Keynes and I hope this will serve to raise the profile of midwifery and to mobilise women to demand the service they deserve.

FREEDOM FOR BIRTH FILM SCREENING Thursday 20th September 2012 Two showings, 1pm and 7pm

The Bee House

Interchange House

Howard Way

Newport Pagnell

MK16 9PX

  • Entrance by donation – suggested donation £5 (Any profits to be donated to Midwifery Campaign)
  • Refreshments available at the venue
  • Birth related Exhibition and discussion after film showing

ALL WELCOME – please advertise widely! Please print and display the attached poster

For further information & to book a seat please email info@3shiresmidwife.co.uk

FREEDOM FOR BIRTH – GLOBAL FILM LAUNCHA new documentary that reframes childbirth as the most pressing global Human Rights issue today is launching with hundreds of premieres all over the world on the same day, Thursday 20th September 2012.

Freedom For Birth is a 60 minute campaigning documentary featuring a Who’s Who of leading birth experts and international Human Rights lawyers all calling for radical change to the world’s maternity systems.

Hermine Hayes-Klein, US lawyer and organiser of the recent Human Rights in Childbirth Conference at the Hague, the Netherlands says, “the way that childbirth is being managed in many countries around the world is deeply problematic. Millions of pregnant women are pushed into hospitals, pushed onto their back and cut open. They are subject to unnecessary pharmaceutical and surgical interventions that their care providers openly admit to imposing on them for reasons of finance and convenience. Women around the world are waking up to the fact that childbirth doesn’t have to be like this and it shouldn’t. Disrespect and abuse are not the necessary price of safety”.

Made by British filmmakers Toni Harman and Alex Wakeford, Freedom For Birth film tells the story of an Hungarian midwife Agnes Gereb who has been jailed for supporting women giving birth at home. One of the home birth mothers supported by Ms Gereb decided to take a stand.

When pregnant with her second child, Anna Ternovsky took her country to the European Court of Human Rights and won a landmark case that has major implications for childbirth around the world.

Toni Harman, one of the filmmakers says, “the Ternovsky vs Hungary ruling at the European Court of Human Rights in 2010 means that now in Europe, every birthing woman has the legal right to decide where and how she gives birth. And across the world, it means that if a woman feels like her Human Rights are being violated because her birth choices are not being fully supported, she could use the power of the law to protect those rights. With the release of “Freedom For Birth”, we hope millions of women become aware of their legal rights and so our film has the potential to spark a revolution in maternity care across the world. In fact, we are calling this the Mothers’ Revolution.”

Cathy Warwick, Chief Executive of the Royal College of Midwives (RCM), says: “A safe childbirth should be a fundamental human right for women. Sadly, for many, many millions of women and their babies across the world this is not the case. The world is desperately short of the people who can help to ensure and deliver this human right; midwives. There is a real need for leaders of nations to invest in midwifery care in their countries. I hope that the making of this film which the RCM is supporting with a screening will go a long way to help make skilled maternity care a reality for those women who currently do not have access to it.”

Lesley Page, President of the Royal College of Midwives adds, “Too many women across the world are dying or suffering terribly because of a lack of skilled maternity care. This is unacceptable and I call on all Governments across the world to give women the right and access to safe care in pregnancy and childbirth.”

Ms. Hayes-Klein concludes, “Freedom For Birth” holds the answer to changing the system. Birth will change when women realise they have a right to meaningful support for childbirth and claim that right. Birth will change when women stand up against the abuses that are currently suffered in such high numbers and say, No More.”

The filmmakers are aiming for 1,000 screenings happening across the world on Thursday 20th September, 2012. The countries with confirmed screenings include the UK, Ireland, Germany, France, Denmark, Spain, Greece, Italy, Norway, the Netherlands, Sweden, Austria, Poland, Bulgaria, Croatia, Slovenia, Slovakia, Belgium, Hungary, Israel, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Russia, USA, Canada, Mexico, Colombia, Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Panama, Australia, New Zealand, Malaysia, Philippines, China, South Africa and India.

Each screening is being organised by local birth campaigners.

Freedom For Birth is Harman and Wakeford’s third documentary film about birth. They were inspired to make films about following their own difficult birth of their daughter four years ago. A cascade of interventions in their birth led to an emergency caesarean section.

Contact Information:

Toni Harman, Producer/Director, Freedom For Birth info@altofilms.com +44 (0) 1273 747837

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http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/health/article6932530.ece

Men who panic when their partners go into labour may be rushing them into hospital too early. Professor Mary Nolan, of the University of Worcester, said that their interference could be overriding the advice from midwives and leading to greater numbers of complicated births.

Labour can last 12 to 18 hours for a woman giving birth for the first time, and the longer women are in hospital the more likely they are to receive medical interventions such as painkillers or drugs to hasten labour when they don’t need them.

Midwives try to encourage women to stay at home as long as possible because evidence suggests that the longer a woman stays out of hospital, the more straightforward her labour. Hospitals also want to avoid women blocking beds for hours before they give birth.

But a survey of 2,400 women visiting the parenting website Babycentre.co.uk and follow-up phone interviews with new mothers found that despite the advice of midwives to stay at home during the early stages of labour, many fathers had been anxious to get to hospital quickly.

Professor Mary Nolan, from the University of Worcester, said: “Women rely on their partners to support them during labour but many first-time fathers feel that they should get their partner into hospital as quickly as possible.

“Although women are prepared to heed the advice to stay calm and remain at home until they really feel like their labour is progressing fast, the fretting of their partners drove them to go in earlier than they would otherwise have done”.

The findings come as the role of fathers before and during childbirth will be debated at the Royal College of Midwives’ Annual Conference in Manchester today.

Michel Odent, a leading French obstetrician and author, will argue that men should not be present in the delivery room when women give birth, as their anxiety can be catching and make labour longer, more painful or likely to result in a Caesarean section. Men now attend more than 90 per cent of births in the UK, a proportion that has grown significantly since the 1950s.

Dr Odent believes that the birth process had become too “masculinised” in recent years, and delivery of babies would be easier if women were left with only an experienced midwife to help them, as used to be the case.

“It is absolutely normal that men are not relaxed when their partners are giving birth, but their release of adrenaline can be contagious,” he said yesterday. “When a woman releases adrenaline she cannot release oxytocin, the main hormone involved in childbirth, which can make labour longer and more difficult.”

“We have to reconsider the political correctness of the couple giving birth together; it’s not necessarily the best way.”

Duncan Fisher, chief executive of the website Dad.Info, will oppose the motion that “Birth is no place for a father”.

“Of course, not all men are nervous and a lot of women would be even more nervous without their partner there,” he said. “Mothers want them there because it is not home.”

Professor Nolan added that the presence of a caring partner in the labour ward could be valuable to women, especially if shortages of staff meant that no midwives could provide continuous care and support during and after birth.

A poll of 3,500 new mothers for the RCM this week found that one in three were left alone and worried during labour or shortly after giving birth on the NHS.

Andy Burnham, the Health Secretary, said this week that he intends to reform the system of hospital funding to take account of patients’ satisfaction rates, starting with maternity care.

Andrew Lansley, the Shadow Health Secretary is due to announce Conservative policies today which will include “drawing in the whole family around the time of birth” and improving antenatal care. “We often do not involve the father and grandparents as much as they and the mothers would like,” a Tory spokesman said.

Cathy Warwick, the RCM’s General Secretary, commented: “We support a mother’s right to choose her birth partner during labour. There is no evidence base or research, of which we are aware, to suggest that a father’s presence impedes and interferes with the mother’s birth. We will welcome a healthy discussion of these issues during the debate at the conference.”

(Written November 2009)


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