Valerie Gommon Midwife’s Blog

Archive for the ‘Joanna Moorhead’ Category

In a paper published yesterday in the British Medical Journal researchers from the University of London Institute of Child Health (UCL) claim that relying purely on breastfeeding for the first six months might not be best for babies. Interestingly, the study “acknowledges that three or four of the authors have performed consultancy work and/or received research funding from companies manufacturing infant formula” which brings into question the validity of the research; a further criticism is that research needs to be population specific.

Today, many prominent organisations have spoken against this paper, however it is confusing for members of the public and undermines the work that midwives and others do to promote breastfeeding.

The current advice in the United Kingdom based on World Health Organisation guidelines, says that babies should be exclusively breastfed for 6 months however the UCL team say that weaning could happen as early as four months as it is claimed that the later weaning might increase food allergies and lead to nutrient deficiencies.  This statement is heralded as a “retrograde step” by the Royal College of Midwives professional policy adviser Janet Fyle and others.   Indeed a Department of Health spokeswoman said: “Breast milk provides all the nutrients a baby needs up to six months of age and we recommend exclusive breastfeeding for this time. Mothers who wish to introduce solids before six months should always talk to health professionals first.

In summary the current best advice is to exclusively breastfeed for six months and then to continue breastfeeding with food supplements for at least a year.

Further discussion can be found at:
www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2011/jan/14/breastfeeding-comment-joanna-moorhead

Joanna Moorhead writes in The Guardian about how hospitals are trying to reduce the trend of repeat caesareans www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2009/jun/16/caesarean-elective-section-giving-birth

The caesarean section rate is shockingly high.  The Association for Improvements in Maternity Services (AIMS) wrote in 2004 that the caesarean rates had continued to rise to 23 per cent, but many hospitals had rates approaching 30 per cent, indeed The Portland private maternity hospital had almost a 90% section rate.  The national caesarean section rate has continued to rise and in 2007 – 2008 was quoted as 24.6% .

Moorhead’s article highlights the dilemma – one woman was encouraged to attempt a vaginal birth after having had a caesarean first time around – sadly this woman ended up with a repeat caesarean however another woman was supported by a sympathetic obstetrician and given information about the benefits of trying for a normal birth – this woman went on to have a normal birth and was very happy with the outcome.

In fact the chances of having a vaginal birth after a caesarean are actually very good (this is obviously something you will need to discuss with your midwife and obstetrician) and I am happy to report that I have supported many women to achieve this.  There are some women however who will need a caesarean and we need to be careful not to make them feel that they have failed when a caesarean is necessary.  It is important to remember that without recourse to good medical help some women and babies would not survive!

If this is something you wish to discuss further I would be happy to speak to you, feel free to contact me by email info@3shiresmidwife.co.uk

I have also been given a copy of “Real Healing after Caesarean” by Martha Jesty which I confess I still have to read!


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