Valerie Gommon Midwife’s Blog

Archive for the ‘maternity’ Category

Very sadly it looks fairly certain that Independent Midwifery will end in October 2013.  The Government and Nursing and Midwifery Council have for a long time been recommending that Independent Midwives should have professional indemnity insurance (negligence insurance) despite it not being commercially available in the marketplace i.e. insurers do not provide this insurance for midwives.  You can read more about the current situation here http://www.independentmidwives.org.uk/?node=11615

An E.U. Directive is now due to come into force to implement this change and our current information is that it will be illegal for us to practice without professional indemnity insurance from October 2013.  This means that women will be denied the choice of choosing an Independent Midwife and we will be denied the choice of working independently and will be forced to stop practising or to return into the NHS.

The Independent Midwives UK organisation has been working tirelessly for years to find a solution and it is just possible that an eleventh hour solution will be found but this is now looking unlikely.

A group of midwives have formed an organisation called Neighbourhood Midwives www.neighbourhoodmidwives.org.uk/ and are working towards setting up an employee-owned social enterprise organization, to provide an NHS commissioned caseload midwifery homebirth service, based in the local community.  This may prove to be a workable alternative to Independent Midwifery but at present (if it comes to fruition) the service will only be able to accept “low-risk” women and this is of concern to all of us who have supported women with more complex situations, for example first time mothers, vaginal birth after a previous caesarean, twins, breech birth and women who are not deemed “low risk”.  The aim of Neighbourhood Midwives will be to extend their remit to include more women as soon as possible.

There is already a precedent for this type of care as One to One Midwives in Liverpool www.onetoonemidwives.org have already managed to set up a caseloading midwifery service (similar to independent midwifery in that a woman will care for a caseload of women throughout the whole of the pregnancy, birth and postnatal period) within the NHS.

It is a very sad time for midwifery and for women’s choice, but perhaps good things will come out of it, I certainly hope so.

This is a Guest Blog written by Sandra Beale from SJ Beale HR Consult Ltd.

On 3 April 2011 the standard rate of statutory maternity, paternity and adoption pay increases from £124.88 to £128.73.  Furthermore there will be changes to maternity and paternity leave with a right to additional paternity leave for fathers with babies due on or after 3 April 2011.

 

Fathers already have the right to take up to two weeks’ paternity leave which is paid at the statutory rate. The new right involves fathers (or partners of the mothers) taking up to 26 weeks leave if the mother returns to work without taking all of her maternity leave, the child is 20 weeks old and before they have their first birthday. The new legislation will also apply to fathers/partners who are matched for adoption on after 3 April 2011.  The right extends to the spouse, civil partner and partner of the child’s mother where they have the main responsibility (with the exception of the mother) for caring for the child.  The new right might be particularly welcomed by couples where the mother is the higher earner and who wishes to return to work and allow the child to be looked after by her partner.  The father (or partner) will have to give no less than eight weeks’ notice of their intention to take the leave and will have similar protections whilst on additional paternity leave to those that women benefit from during maternity leave (i.e. the right to return to the same job, keeping in touch days, etc).  An employer has the right to request evidence of the birth/adoption.

 

Actions employers need to take:

 

Review maternity and paternity policies and procedures to ensure they takeinto account the changes from April 2011 onwards

 

 

 

Put systems in place to ensure the correct information about additional paternity leave and pay is captured – by using template notices and employee/mother declaration forms

 

 

 

Organise internal processes to ensure that entitlement to additional paternity leave/pay is included

 

For more information contact Sandra Beale on 07762 771290.

 

http://www.sjbealehrconsult.co.uk

 

 

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads This blog is on fire!.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A helper monkey made this abstract painting, inspired by your stats.

A Boeing 747-400 passenger jet can hold 416 passengers. This blog was viewed about 3,900 times in 2010. That’s about 9 full 747s.

 

In 2010, there were 53 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 172 posts. There were 2 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 2mb.

The busiest day of the year was April 7th with 144 views. The most popular post that day was Birth before the arrival of a midwife.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were 3shiresmidwife.co.uk, facebook.com, en.wordpress.com, twitter.com, and studentmidwife.net.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for midwife blog, valerie gommon, skinny women and pregnancy, albany midwives suspended, and placentophagy research.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

Birth before the arrival of a midwife May 2009

2

“Super skinny pregnancies” March 2009
6 comments

3

Independent Midwifery and snow Part II January 2010
4 comments

4

Eating the placenta (placentophagy)? October 2009
3 comments

5

Freebirthing / Unassisted birth May 2009
5 comments

Guest blog by Susan Quayle

I became interested in reflexology about fifteen years ago when I bought Laura Norman’s book, The Reflexology Handbook: A Complete Guide. At the time my sister-in-law was pregnant and had morning sickness so badly that she was bed ridden and under threat of hospitalisation. I got my book out and looked up morning sickness in the back and worked the reflexes it showed – having no real idea of what I was doing – and the result was instantaneous. She felt much better than she had for weeks.

It would be a further twelve years before I would work on feet again but this time it would be to train as a reflexologist. About a year after I’d qualified I received an email asking if I would be interested in attending a course in Maternity Reflexology. By this time I’d had two children and was the bearer of double C-section scars so was very interested in what maternity reflexology could offer the pregnant woman. I went along to the course expecting something amazing but not  really prepared for the actuality of how utterly brilliant reflexology is for pregnancy and labour. I came away thinking that Maternity Units were crazy not to have maternity reflexologists working alongside midwives or midwives trained as maternity reflexologists.

Reflexology is fabulous for for everyone but is utterly perfect for pregnancy and labour. They really go together like, like….mother and baby!

Apart from the very serious conditions that are potentially life threatening to mother and/or baby there isn’t a pregnancy related condition that can’t be alleviated and, more impressively, prevented with reflexology. Because pregnancy isn’t an illness but a temporary condition the usual parameters relating to conditions such as oedema, constipation and other digestive related problems, even gestational diabetes, are different from at any other time and if caught in time respond extremely well to reflexology. I say caught in time because some conditions such as oedema need to be treated early as they worsen on a daily basis.

During a treatment mums drift off into deep relaxation, babies squirm excitedly before relaxing with mum into a blissful baby/mummy zone of bonding. During this relaxation blood pressure reduces, energy is restored and reserved, anxiety levels drop and a sense of self and safety permeates the body. Reflexes are worked to balance the internal organs and systems of the body and allow the free flow of blood and energy to every cell of their being. I am always amazed at how early in pregnancy it is possible to feel the subtle changes that take place in the mother’s body – usually the liver and spleen reflexes as the volume of blood increases to produce the growing baby’s blood supply.

I have had many successes with morning sickness, heartburn and fatigue, SPD, constipation, reducing blood pressure, oedema, early onset labour (this treatment was to stop labour at 33 weeks), re-starting labour 5 hours after it had stopped, lack of sleep, discomfort, positive mental attitude toward the growing baby and also toward the mother’s own body image. Regular treatments can also result in a faster labour with less need for pain relief – studies have been done to back up these claims. Women I have treated with regular treatments feel very in touch with their babies and their pregnancies, they tend to say that their labour was easier than previous ones and that they felt more relaxed about the whole experience. They also say that their babies are very relaxed and laid back and that both mother and baby have found breast feeding much easier than in previous births. Reflexology promotes healthy pregnancies, healthy mothers, faster births often with less need for pain relief, happy mothers and happy babies.

I often feel great sadness that I didn’t know about maternity reflexology when I was pregnant as both my birth experiences were over-medicalised and with the use of reflexology might not have been. So this is the message that needs to get out there to all pregnant women – there is help out there to complement and work alongside normal medical practices. You are not ill – you are pregnant and you are doing what your body was made to do. Reflexology can help you to have a happy, healthy pregnancy and baby.

Susan Quayle is a Complementary Therapist based at the Exeter Natural Health Centre in Devon. She is a founder member of Maternity Reflexology South West who work tirelessly to promote maternity reflexology. She lives with her husband, two children, cat and chickens.

To find out more about her visit her website at http://www.lovereflexology.co.uk

Introduction to Homoeopathy – Ursula Kraus-Harper

Thursday 17th June 8 – 9.30 pm

Talk at NCT event Medbourne Community Sports Pavilion, Pascale Drive, Medbourne

Milton Keynes Antenatal Exhibition

Sunday 20th June,

2-4.30 pm FREE entry,

Christ the Cornerstone Church, CMK opp M&S bit.ly/dBsLmL 300 Saxon Gate West, Central Milton Keynes, MK9 2ES.

FREE entry, refreshment and goody bags. An opportunity for expectant parents to gather information on all aspects of pregnancy, birth and early parenting. Exhibitors include: midwives, breastfeeding, waterbirth, cloth nappies, complementary therapies, ultrasound scan, baby massage, aquanatal and much more!

Please contact me info@3shiresmidwife.co.uk for more details.

I was really pleased to hear a very balanced “Case Notes” radio programme about Maternity Services presented by Dr Mark Porter.

The programme discussed the varying styles of maternity care, including homebirth and Consultant Obstetrician, Mike Marsh from Kings in London was supportive and open to women’s choices.

This won’t be up for long, but well worth listening to ….

http://bit.ly/ahpbMa

We have had two weeks of the eight week Channel 4 documentary series ‘One Born Every Minute’.  The series follows the day-to-day life in a maternity ward and was filmed over the course of a month.  The programme goes out on Tuesday evenings at 9pm.

The programme highlights the intense experience of childbirth from the perspective of both parents-to-be and also midwives and maternity ward staff. 

The programme, for me, is very interesting and also very realistic of the pressures faced by staff and women alike, however it is edited in a very dramatic style featuring women screaming, babies crying and moments of intensity and drama (of course, this is TV!).  I have had clients contact me having been quite upset by the programme.  I just hope they also show some of the lovely normality of birth, the quiet, serene, beautiful births and not just the drama.

http://lifebegins.channel4.com/

From next year the Government has pledged that all women will be offered a choice of where to give birth including at home but so far only half of women are reporting that they were offered a home birth.

A recent survey carried out by www.netmums.com revealed that as many as one-third of all women in NHS hospitals are left alone and worried during, or shortly after childbirth and more than 30 per cent of mums polled received no NHS antenatal classes and 43 per cent did not have access to a midwife on a postnatal ward.

Women who participated in the poll were also very critical of postnatal care, including support offered for breast-feeding, this is despite the fact that the Government is now putting huge investment into improving breastfeeding rates; some women also mentioned that they felt the lack of care had led to postnatal depression.

Cathy Warwick, General Secretary of the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) said maternity services in England are at a critical point; she said that progress was being made. but went on to say that the target to give women a choice of where to give birth looked like it would be missed.  Warwick said surveys suggested full choice was only offered in about 50% of cases.  She also said services were also struggling to cope with the rising birth rate  which has jumped by 20% since 2001.

The RCM say that staffing numbers have increased, but by less than 10%, leaving the health service short of 5,000; they also highlighted that student midwives are finding it difficult to gain employment.

The Netmums website has teamed up with the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) to discover your most recent experiences of maternity services so we can work together to instigate improvements.  Please take a few minutes to complete the joint survey so that areas for improvement in maternity services can be targeted. Please answer the questions in relation to your most recent birth. The results of the survey will be presented jointly with the RCM and Netmums at the RCM’s annual conference on November 26-27th in Manchester and featured in the media before the conference.

The survey can be found at www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=B6ZD2GutcFLoG8h7MuAMdA_3d_3d

Written by Jenny Cassidy www.hrdept.co.uk Telephone: 0845 290 3910

Plans to allow fathers to benefit from up to six months’ additional paternity leave – three paid – if the mother returns to work before the end of the maternity leave period have been given the go ahead. The new right, due to come into force from 2011, will apply during the second half of a baby’s first year. In practice there is the possibility that this could become an administrative nightmare with the cross over between two people likely to be working in different businesses. We wait and see … the Government has actually shelved plans in the immediate future to increase paid maternity leave to 52 weeks to coincide with the 52 week maternity leave period. It will remain at 39 weeks, first 6 weeks 90% average earnings, remaining 33 weeks at statutory maternity pay £123.06 per week.


Twitter