Valerie Gommon Midwife’s Blog

Archive for the ‘Milton Keynes’ Category

Guest blog from Hazel Roberts, Jammy Cow MK

Valerie says, “I am delighted to have been part of Milton Keynes Midnight Moo, and part of the Moos at Ten team!”

Hazel writes:

Last Saturday night  was the 2012 Midnight Moo – an all ladies 10 mile walk through Milton Keynes. The herd set off a midnight and whilst they were busy striding through the early miles, Jammy Cow and her heifer friends were busy preparing the final mile for their welcome home.
At the beginning of mile 10, ready to greet the herd for their final mile was the very professional Moos at Ten Cow, Mavis.  She is a very sensible and reliable cow and in stark contrast to the next cow round the first corner. Silly Cow, Connie giggled her way through the night.
Those of you who walked the 10 miles will know that most of mile 10 is uphill so the Moos at Ten team were ready to add that extra bit of encouragement as the herd came through. Having said that, Bossy Cow’s version of encouragement is about as friendly as bootcamp with her strident, “Keep moooving!” shout. It is at this point in the early hours of the morning that you realise exactly how far 10 miles is to walk. “Holy cow, aren’t we there yet?” you may mutter as you pass the pious Holy Cow, Mary.

Continuing up Midsummer Boulevard, the end is near and breakfast at Pret A Manger awaits, a thought not lost on the perpetually hungry Fat Cow, Victoria as she patiently waved the crowds through. Normally, Hetty the Mad Cow stands out as a bit odd but last night she was in good company with lots of ladies suitably dressed up for the night.

Through Witan Gate underpass and by now there is less than half a mile to go. Bed is calling and lucky you, you’ll soon be home and tucked up. Lucy, the Lucky Cow was there, cheering you on for the final push. And only another 50 calories left to burn, something Clover, the Skinny Cow was quick to point out. Nearly at the end of mile 10 now and so very close to achieving your aim. A point to feel proud and to reflect upon why you are doing this. Willen Hospice is a fantastic cause and everyone is impressed by your fundraising efforts. Remember those Concrete Cows you passed in mile 7, well one makes a final appearance here to salute your efforts on behalf of Milton Keynes.

And there, with the end in sight, Jammy Cow welcomes you to the end of mile 10 and congratulates you on completing the Midnight Moo. A big cheer, breakfast, bath and bed.

So can you work out how many cows there were on mile 10 of the Midnight Moo? If you can and you are local to Milton Keynes then why not enter our competition to win a fabulous hamper of goodies. Visit or email your answer to


Where to start?  Every day is different, so I’m going to give you a flavour of the sort of things I get up to.

Of course I have antenatal appointments; from the first tentative telephone enquiry I then arrange to meet up with a potential client (usually for an hour or so) so that we can discuss their past experiences, their hopes for this pregnancy, their concerns and most importantly so that they can get a “feel” as to whether they actually like and trust me.  Once a couple have decided to book me as their midwife I then usually give all their antenatal care in their own home (although I have done antenatal visits in The Bank of England medical room!).  The format of visits is that I carry out all the usual blood tests, urine and blood pressure checks, but also leave a lot of time for discussion so that over the course of the pregnancy we cover issues such as waterbirth, Vitamin K, when to call me and so on.

My clients come from a wide area – I am happy to take clients who live within approximately an hour’s radius of my home in Leighton Buzzard – so I do spend a fair bit of time driving, as well as liaising with G.P.’s and hospitals where necessary.

Four times a year I jointly organise an Antenatal Exhibition, this is an opportunity for pregnant couples to gather information about breastfeeding, pregnancy yoga, cloth nappies and the like.  We also organise Birth Preparation Workshops and am often to be found at the Community Desk in Central Milton Keynes on hand to speak to expectant parents and also regularly attend Study Day’s and midwifery meetings to ensure that I keep myself up-to-date with current research.

Obviously I spend much of my time being “on-call” for births.  My own family are now pretty much grown-up and the commitment isn’t as big as one might imagine as I rarely have more than two births during a month – it is important that I don’t over-commit myself as the whole point of what I do is that I guarantee to be there for the birth.  Babies don’t always read the text books though!  I have had three births in one week, as of course some babies do come early and some come late!  As you will appreciate, the birth is the big event, and it can on occasion go on for some time.

Baby being here doesn’t mean that my job ends!  In fact, postnatal visiting is often one of the busiest times as the family may need quite a lot of support in the early days.  The majority of my clients choose to give birth at home; however some either need to, or choose to give birth in hospital.

I visit my clients for up to four weeks postnatally and it is a joy to see the baby thriving and although discharging clients is always tinged with sadness it is also great to know that I have played a part in helping the family on to the next stage of their life.  (I do usually keep in touch, perhaps not as often as I would like, but I often get e-mails and photographs and usually pop in when I’m passing!).

So, in summary I guess the main differences between me and an NHS midwife are that you are buying my time; antenatal visits usually take around an hour and a half (instead of perhaps 10 – 15 minutes at your local surgery), are arranged more frequently and take place at a time and place to suit you. Most importantly you will receive full continuity of care – I will see you at each visit to build our relationship and plan your care and you will know that (barring exceptional circumstances) I will be with you in labour and available 24/7 for urgent help.

I am always happy to discuss anything that you are concerned about; please do feel free to call.

Written by Valerie Gommon, BA (Hons), RM, Independent Midwife 01525 385153

I am excited to tell you that I have a new promotional video which details the work I do at

I also have several other videos hosted on YouTube and plan to add more as soon as possible; I should tell you that some of the content is explicit and shows graphic scenes of childbirth.

Slightly old news now … can’t believe that I forgot to write about this, but … and even better, I’ve posted my first photograph!

Despite (by her own admission) being very unfit, local Independent Midwife Valerie Gommon joined 2000 other women to take part in the Midnight Moo Walk for Willen Hospice last Saturday 17th July.  Local women walked 10 miles around Milton Keynes starting and finishing at Midsummer Place, The Centre:MK.  It was a fantastic (some say scary), sight to see the women in their pink Midnight Moo t-shirts snaking through the dark redways of Milton Keynes; despite the hour, there were plenty of people out and about to support us, with car horns beeping and people waving from their houses, we were also fortunate to have an army of volunteers to mark the route, offering support and encouragement along the way – their kind support kept us going!

Last year’s walk raised more than £100,000 for Willen Hospice and this year the amount already stands at £91,355 with money still rolling in, so it isn’t too late to add your donation

Clare Wildman says: “For me the Midnight Moo sums up all that is truly great about Milton Keynes. The way that so many people of all ages and backgrounds come together to do something a little crazy for such a good cause and the fantastic way that it runs so smoothly and everyone has such fun.”

If you are interested in walking next year you can register at

Here is a picture of Valerie along with Clare Wildman and Ady Cartwright (aka Mrs Paintbrush) preparing for the walk.Preparing for the Midnight Moo

Introduction to Homoeopathy – Ursula Kraus-Harper

Thursday 17th June 8 – 9.30 pm

Talk at NCT event Medbourne Community Sports Pavilion, Pascale Drive, Medbourne

Milton Keynes Antenatal Exhibition

Sunday 20th June,

2-4.30 pm FREE entry,

Christ the Cornerstone Church, CMK opp M&S 300 Saxon Gate West, Central Milton Keynes, MK9 2ES.

FREE entry, refreshment and goody bags. An opportunity for expectant parents to gather information on all aspects of pregnancy, birth and early parenting. Exhibitors include: midwives, breastfeeding, waterbirth, cloth nappies, complementary therapies, ultrasound scan, baby massage, aquanatal and much more!

Please contact me for more details.

Just a quick “rant” here – did you see a news item this week suggesting that Nursing and Midwifery training posts may be cut in a bid to save money?

I was shouting at the TV – what a complete and utter disaster this would be.  We already have a national shortage of midwives and we certainly are not training enough new midwives.  Indeed Milton Keynes NHS Hospital Trust is stating that it is unable to recruit enough midwives to meet their staffing needs and cites the national shortage of midwives as part of the problem.

The attrition rate of students midwives is also incredibly high, perhaps up to 50%, and Trusts are also struggling to have enough qualified midwives to train students and once qualified a sizable number of midwives quickly leave the profession as they are not supported into the role and find the job too demanding.

We need more nurses and midwives, not less and any further decrease in staff numbers will only put additional pressure on the existing workforce and lead to yet more clinical staff leaving their chosen profession.

Women and midwives need to join together to protect the future of midwifery!

As an Independent Midwife I have clients within quite a wide geographic area, and it isn’t unusual to have a client who lives up to an hour from my home.  If the client has had several children and previous quick labours I occasionally sleep over at their house when they may be in early labour to ensure that I can get to them in time.  However, although my last client usually had long labours and I was thinking that I’d have plenty of time to get there, but when I saw the snow expected I decided that I should go and camp out with her just in case I couldn’t get to her.  I drove over (in blizzard conditions) and felt very relieved that I had as I wouldn’t have relished the journey in the middle of the night.  In the event, her baby didn’t arrive that night, but she laboured the following afternoon and her baby was born in her sitting room at around 9pm.  It was a fabulous birth, in the pool surrounded by her husband, mother and two children who watched in awe.  We all tucked up in bed afterwards, very content and secure.

The following morning after breakfast I was able to perform a postnatal examination on both mother and baby and had the opportunity to discuss the nights events with my client and her children before setting off to go home.

Fortunately my next clients are much more local to home, but I confess to waking several times in the night recently to look out and check how much snow has fallen – after all a midwife can’t stop working just because there is a little (or a lot) of snow!