Valerie Gommon Midwife’s Blog

Archive for the ‘Vitamin K’ Category

Where to start?  Every day is different, so I’m going to give you a flavour of the sort of things I get up to.

Of course I have antenatal appointments; from the first tentative telephone enquiry I then arrange to meet up with a potential client (usually for an hour or so) so that we can discuss their past experiences, their hopes for this pregnancy, their concerns and most importantly so that they can get a “feel” as to whether they actually like and trust me.  Once a couple have decided to book me as their midwife I then usually give all their antenatal care in their own home (although I have done antenatal visits in The Bank of England medical room!).  The format of visits is that I carry out all the usual blood tests, urine and blood pressure checks, but also leave a lot of time for discussion so that over the course of the pregnancy we cover issues such as waterbirth, Vitamin K, when to call me and so on.

My clients come from a wide area – I am happy to take clients who live within approximately an hour’s radius of my home in Leighton Buzzard – so I do spend a fair bit of time driving, as well as liaising with G.P.’s and hospitals where necessary.

Four times a year I jointly organise an Antenatal Exhibition, this is an opportunity for pregnant couples to gather information about breastfeeding, pregnancy yoga, cloth nappies and the like.  We also organise Birth Preparation Workshops and am often to be found at the Community Desk in Central Milton Keynes on hand to speak to expectant parents and also regularly attend Study Day’s and midwifery meetings to ensure that I keep myself up-to-date with current research.

Obviously I spend much of my time being “on-call” for births.  My own family are now pretty much grown-up and the commitment isn’t as big as one might imagine as I rarely have more than two births during a month – it is important that I don’t over-commit myself as the whole point of what I do is that I guarantee to be there for the birth.  Babies don’t always read the text books though!  I have had three births in one week, as of course some babies do come early and some come late!  As you will appreciate, the birth is the big event, and it can on occasion go on for some time.

Baby being here doesn’t mean that my job ends!  In fact, postnatal visiting is often one of the busiest times as the family may need quite a lot of support in the early days.  The majority of my clients choose to give birth at home; however some either need to, or choose to give birth in hospital.

I visit my clients for up to four weeks postnatally and it is a joy to see the baby thriving and although discharging clients is always tinged with sadness it is also great to know that I have played a part in helping the family on to the next stage of their life.  (I do usually keep in touch, perhaps not as often as I would like, but I often get e-mails and photographs and usually pop in when I’m passing!).

So, in summary I guess the main differences between me and an NHS midwife are that you are buying my time; antenatal visits usually take around an hour and a half (instead of perhaps 10 – 15 minutes at your local surgery), are arranged more frequently and take place at a time and place to suit you. Most importantly you will receive full continuity of care – I will see you at each visit to build our relationship and plan your care and you will know that (barring exceptional circumstances) I will be with you in labour and available 24/7 for urgent help.

I am always happy to discuss anything that you are concerned about; please do feel free to call.

Written by Valerie Gommon, BA (Hons), RM, Independent Midwife

www.3shiresmidwife.co.uk 01525 385153

A birth plan is optional – it enables you to devise your own personal plan of care if this is your wish, and can be helpful to health professionals in knowing your thoughts.

It is also an opportunity to make a decision about your care on the basis of informed choice.  By compiling a birth plan, it does not imply that you want a ‘natural’ or ‘alternative’ labour and a birth plan can be changed at any point, it is just an indication of your wishes.

Whether you decide to make a birth plan or not, your care should be discussed with you and no treatment or procedures performed without a full explanation and your consent.

The following are some suggestions of things you might like to include in your birth plan:

Who you want with you for the birth (e.g your partner, a friend or both)

Pain relief (you may be keen to manage without drugs or keen to have as pain free a labour as possible, do you plan a waterbirth)

Positions for labour and birth (you may wish to be able to move around during labour and encouraged to try different positions for the birth)

Monitoring of the baby’s heartbeat (e.g. using a hand-held sonicaid to monitor the baby intermittently or being monitored continuously)

Students (whether you are happy for students to participate in, or witness your birth)

After the birth (do you want pick up the baby yourself/be given the baby or do you want the baby wrapped, do you want to discover the baby’s sex yourself, would your partner (or you) like to cut the cord)

Management of the third stage or placenta (do you want a ‘natural’ third stage or to be given the drug syntometrine

Vitamin K (do you wish your baby to receive Vitamin K either by injection/orally/not at all)

A Birth Plan is just that – a plan, it can be deviated from according to your wishes at the time!

The Department of Health recommends that all newborn babies be
given a Vitamin K supplement at birth. Approximately 1:10,000
babies may have a rare condition known as haemorrhagic disease
of the newborn, a condition whereby the baby may have
spontaneous internal bleeding. Vitamin K is used in the blood
clotting mechanism.

Vitamin K is available by injection or orally and you should decide
whether or not you wish your baby to receive Vitamin K, and if you
do in what form. The booklet “Vitamin K and the Newborn”
produced by AIMS (www.aims.org.uk) provides a detailed
discussion of the subject.

Babies at higher risk of haemorrhagic disease (Vitamin K
Deficiency Bleeding):

  • premature
  • complicated birth e.g. forceps/ventouse/caesarean section
  • have liver disease that may show as prolonged jaundice or have pale stools or dark urine
  • fail to take or find it hard to absorb feeds
  • are ill for other reasons
  • have bleeding or spontaneous bruising in early infancy

It may be helpful to increase Vitamin K in your diet from 36 weeks.
It is also important that from birth, until a year old if you notice
bleeding or bruising which is unexplained that you get this
investigated as a matter of urgency as it could be an indication of
haemorrhagic disease.

Foods containing Vitamin K include:

Yoghurt, alfalfa, egg yolk, soya oil, fish liver oils, wholegrain
cereals, cauliflower, turnips, green leafy vegetables, broccoli,
cabbage, lettuce, green tea and kelp.

Today I am going to write about my latest project, www.BirthIndex.co.uk

 

BirthIndex.co.uk is an on-line Listings Directory for all things related to Pregnancy, Birth and Baby.  As a Registered Midwife I saw the need to produce this on-line Directory to give clients and families comprehensive information about what is available in their LOCAL area. 

At the moment we have sites up and running in the Bedford, Milton Keynes and Northampton areas but hope to expand this shortly.

The site contains listings relating to pre-conception or fertility advice; pregnancy and birth; postnatal issues; baby equipment; complimentary therapists; childcare and other services for example photographers, activities to do with your baby/toddler.  We are also building a reference library of useful articles and currently have articles on the following subjects:

A Day In The Life Of An Independent Midwife

Alternatives To Hospital Induction

Blood Tests And Scans

Blood Tests For Your Baby

Breech Birth

Foods Rich In Iron

Heartburn Relief

Homebirth List Of Useful Items

Independent Midwives – Endangered Species

Planning A Baby

So You Are Pregnant!

The Big Day!

Top Tips For Labour

Vitamin K

Local events will happily be promoted on the site, and a periodic newsletter will be produced to keep families up-to-date.

I am inviting all related businesses to take a FREE listing on this site.  Additionally there are also other advertising opportunities available at half price for limited period; for example “Enhanced Listings” or “Box” and “Banner” advertisements.

Please do go and have a look around my new site www.birthindex.co.uk  

 

Valerie Gommon

 

 


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