Valerie Gommon Midwife’s Blog

Archive for the ‘www.dh.gov.uk’ Category

In a paper published yesterday in the British Medical Journal researchers from the University of London Institute of Child Health (UCL) claim that relying purely on breastfeeding for the first six months might not be best for babies. Interestingly, the study “acknowledges that three or four of the authors have performed consultancy work and/or received research funding from companies manufacturing infant formula” which brings into question the validity of the research; a further criticism is that research needs to be population specific.

Today, many prominent organisations have spoken against this paper, however it is confusing for members of the public and undermines the work that midwives and others do to promote breastfeeding.

The current advice in the United Kingdom based on World Health Organisation guidelines, says that babies should be exclusively breastfed for 6 months however the UCL team say that weaning could happen as early as four months as it is claimed that the later weaning might increase food allergies and lead to nutrient deficiencies.  This statement is heralded as a “retrograde step” by the Royal College of Midwives professional policy adviser Janet Fyle and others.   Indeed a Department of Health spokeswoman said: “Breast milk provides all the nutrients a baby needs up to six months of age and we recommend exclusive breastfeeding for this time. Mothers who wish to introduce solids before six months should always talk to health professionals first.

In summary the current best advice is to exclusively breastfeed for six months and then to continue breastfeeding with food supplements for at least a year.

Further discussion can be found at:
www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2011/jan/14/breastfeeding-comment-joanna-moorhead

Understandably, one of the “hot topics” of the moment is should pregnant women accept the Swine Flu vaccine.

On discussions with women I have met with many women who are concerned about the vaccine and unsure whether to be vaccinated

Pregnant women are not known to be more susceptible to catching swine flu but if they do the risk of complications is higher because their immune system is naturally suppressed and the Department of Health is recommending and prioritising the vaccine for pregnant women.  It is important to remember that for the vast majority of people (including pregnant women) that, although unpleasant, influenza is self-limiting and the vast majority of people will make a quick recovery.  Should a pregnant women develop flu the recommended treatment is early instigation of antiviral therapy.

www.dh.gov.uk/prod_consum_dh/groups/dh_digitalassets/@dh/@en/@ps/@sta/@perf/documents/digitalasset/dh_107768.pdf

Recent Department of Health advice is available at: www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publichealth/Flu/Swineflu/DH_107340

Obviously if you are unwell do follow the Government’s advice http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Swineflu/DG_177831 or contact your doctor or midwife for advice.

However a recent Guardian article quoted a survey, published by the website mumsnet.com, confirmed the uncertainty felt as almost half – 48% – of pregnant women who responded said they probably or definitely would not have the jab if it is available. Only 6% said they definitely would and 22% said they probably would.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/sep/02/swine-flu-vaccine-pregnant-women

Another recent article www.examiner.com/x-4079-SF-Sexual-Health-Examiner~y2009m10d23-California-suspends-ban-on-thimerosal-containing-H1N1-vaccine-for-pregnant-women  also raises concerns about the immunisation programme.

I am unsure which vaccine is being given to pregnant women in the UK – this may be something for you to research further.

Good luck with your decision making.

When a mum is breastfeeding she is giving her baby the very best – breastmilk is full of antibodies and is therefore hugely protective.

The Department of Health has issued advice on what to do when breastfeeding if you have contracted the flu.  If a mum is receiving antiviral treatment or prophylaxis, they are advised to continue to breastfeed as frequent as possible and continue to have as much skin to skin contact as possible with the baby.  Ensuring hands are washed as frequent as possible as well as limiting the sharing of toys.

For more information on breastfeeding and swine flu go to www.dh.gov.uk/en/Healthcare/Children/Maternity/Maternalandinfantnutrition/DH_099965

When a mum is breastfeeding she is giving her baby the very best – breastmilk is full of antibodies and is therefore hugely protective.

 The Department of Health has issued advice on what to do when breastfeeding if you have contracted the flu.  If a mum is receiving antiviral treatment or prophylaxis, they are advised to continue to breastfeed as frequent as possible and continue to have as much skin to skin contact as possible with the baby.  Ensuring hands are washed as frequent as possible as well as limiting the sharing of toys.

For more information on breastfeeding and swine flu go to www.dh.gov.uk/en/Healthcare/Children/Maternity/Maternalandinfantnutrition/DH_099965


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