Valerie Gommon Midwife’s Blog

Archive for the ‘www.albanymidwives.org.uk’ Category

Pregnancy

“The condition of having a developing embryo or fetus in the body.”
“The process by which a human female carries a live offspring from conception until childbirth.”

Pregnancy is referred to as a gestation period – the time between conception and birth. Approximately 40 weeks (280 days). Measured from the first day of the last menstrual period. For women who use a procedure that allows them to know the exact date of conception (such as in-vitro fertilisation IVF, or artificial insemination) the gestation period is 38 weeks (266 days) from conception.

Pregnancy is divided into three stages – called trimesters, each lasting about 3 months.

An embryo is a multicellular diploid (has two sets of chromosomes) eukaryote (an organism whose cells contain complex structures enclosed within membranes) in its earliest stage of development; from the time of first cell division until birth. In humans, it is called an embryo until about eight weeks after fertilization (i.e. ten weeks after the last menstrual period or LMP), and from then it is instead called a fetus.
Embryo is the term used to describe the developing baby in the first 8 weeks and the term Fetus is the term used after 8 weeks until birth (when all the structure of the baby and systems of the body such as the digestive and nervous systems have developed).

Facts at 24 weeks
24 weeks is the legal cut off gestational age for a legal abortion (although abortions or terminations can be carried out later in the pregnancy on medical grounds).

COMPLICATIONS OF PREMATURE BIRTH
Babies born after 34 weeks have a low risk of problems although they are sometime slower to feed.
A baby born before 33 weeks will have more serious problems such as immature lungs.
Very premature babies (born under 28 weeks) need to be delivered in a hospital with a neonatal intensive care unit.
Doctors have been able to improve dramatically the survival hopes for babies born as early as 22 or 23 weeks.
However, very premature babies face a huge battle at the start of life. They are at risk of serious conditions including:
* Hypothermia, due to lower levels of fat
* Low blood glucose, which can lead to brain damage
* Respiratory distress syndrome – which can cause blindness
* Brain haemorrhage
Long-term they may have cerebral palsy and have sight and hearing problems.
They are also more likely to have motor impairments and co-ordination and concentration problems.

Birth
Occurs at around 38 weeks after fertilization, so 40 weeks pregnant. Term is considered to be 37 – 42 weeks gestation. The fetus has developed enough to survive easily outside its mother’s body. Babies are usually born head first but occasionally are born breech.

http://www.babycentre.co.uk/v1027487/inside-pregnancy-weeks-28-37

There are a variety of birthing methods; the majority of babies are born by a natural vaginal birth but some labours might need help such as
Ventouse, Forceps, Caesarean section.

The process of natural birth involves what is known as “labour” the baby passing from the mother’s abdomen through the vaginal passage and into the world. There are three stages of labour:

Stage 1: The cervix has to open and stretch around the baby’s head until it is 10cm open.

Stage 2: The baby has to come out, either by the expulsive efforts of the uterus and the mother breathing the baby out, or by her actively pushing the baby out.

Stage 3: The placenta or afterbirth has to be expelled.

Linked blog posts:

https://midwifevalerie.wordpress.com/2008/12/07/so-you-are-pregnant-preparing-for-the-birth/
https://midwifevalerie.wordpress.com/2008/12/19/the-big-day-the-birth/

STOP PRESS STOP PRESS STOP PRESS STOP PRESS STOP PRESS STOP PRESS

Royal College of Midwives (RCM), National Childbirth Trust (NCT) Independent Midwives UK (IM UK) Association of Radical Midwives (ARM) Association for Improvements in Maternity Services (AIMS) and the Albany Mums Support Group present:

THE ‘RECLAIMING BIRTH’ RALLY SUNDAY, MARCH 7th 2010

Please consider joining us for this important Rally to support mothers and babies.  “Mothers and babies are the foundations of our society, what is more important than getting the foundations right?”

This is a once in a lifetime opportunity – with an election coming up – to send a very loud message, there is a real sense of all the different stakeholders being united in one voice and it could, with hindsight be seen as the turning point for the midwifery profession.

We demand that all women should have a midwife they can get to know, be able to access home birth, a local birth centre, and that there should be independent midwifery available as an option for women to choose.

Meet at 1.00PM in Geraldine Mary Harmsworth Park, Lambeth Road, SE14EQ

We will march to Whitehall to hand in a petition to the Health Minister and letters to the Prime Minister

Master of Ceremonies: Peter Duncan.  Speakers include: Professor Wendy Savage, AIMS Chair Beverley Beech, Albany Midwife Becky Reed, IM UK Board Member Annie Francis, NCT CEO Belinda Phipps, Albany Mums Support Group campaigner Emma Neamish and Duncan Fisher OBE

PLEASE TELL EVERYONE ABOUT THIS IMPORTANT RALLY.

It has been a hard week for Milton Keynes Maternity Unit and for midwifery in general.

Milton Keynes has been severely criticised for staffing shortages which may have led to the death of a baby earlier this year; the Albany Midwifery Practice has been suspended and a midwife hung herself after a baby died.  Tragic.

I trained at Milton Keynes General and I know the staff do a fantastic job under very difficult circumstances – it is obvious that staffing is an issue and this is one of the reasons I left the NHS to work in Independent Practice – I just wanted to be able to give a better standard of care to clients and to give continuity so that women know the midwife who will deliver their baby.  I feel so very sad for the woman and the staff involved.  My only hope is that the service will be better funded as a result, but in the meantime local women will be frightened and this is sad.

Most women will receive safe care in Milton Keynes and from the NHS – the NHS is excellent at delivering acute or emergency care – but what they probably won’t receive is the extra TLC to make the experience special – that is down to the individual midwife and luck depending upon how busy the Unit is.

The excellent Albany Practice in London, which has for many years provided amazing NHS care, has also been closed.  There is a campaign to save it at www.savethealbany.org.uk.

Independent Midwifery is always under threat as the Government insist we must get Professional Indemnity Insurance despite it not being commercially available.  Go to www.kentmidwiferypractice.net to support our campaign.

Midwifery in this country is severely under threat – we must fight to keep midwifery alive!

Sadly a midwife took her own life when a baby she had cared for died.  She mistakenly thought that she was to blame.  How desperately sad that midwives feel so afraid.  We do a difficult job and some babies will die no matter how hard we try to save them.  Midwives, in general, do the job because they care – the vast majority will do their very best for the clients they care for – we need to be supported, not witch hunted and blamed.

I can be contacted at www.3shiresmidwife.co.uk / info@3shiresmidwife.co.uk

Well what a surprise, new research “Perinatal mortality and morbidity in a nationwide cohort of 529 688 low-risk planned home and hospital births” http://www.rcog.org.uk/news/bjog-release-new-figures-safety-home-births has found that homebirth is safe for low-risk women.  These findings echo the work of Marjorie Tew way back in 1986 British Journal Obstet Gynaecol 1986 Jul;93(7):659-74

This large scale research from the Netherlands – which has a high rate of home births – found no difference in death rates of either mothers or babies in 530,000 births.

Low-risk women in the study were defined as those who had no known complications – such as a baby in breech or one with a congenital abnormality, or a previous caesarean section; additionally the researchers noted the importance of both highly-trained midwives who knew when to refer a home birth to hospital as well as rapid transportation.

I wholeheartedly support the initiative of the Dutch midwives, and also that of the Albany midwives (based in Peckham, South London) http://www.albanymidwives.org.uk – midwives attend a woman at home in labour and together they decide whether to stay at home or transfer to hospital.  If all is well many mothers opt to labour and give birth at home, but if she prefers to transfer her midwife will accompany her into hospital.

In my Independent Midwifery Practice www.3shiresmidwife.co.uk this is pretty much what happens.  Mothers often plan a homebirth, but know that they can transfer at any point if they wish, conversely if they plan a hospital birth and change their mind I will care for them at home.  Indeed many of my clients would not be considered “low-risk” but these women believe that by staying at home they are more likely to give birth without interference.

The number of mothers giving birth at home in the UK has been rising since it reached a low in 1988; currently only 2.7% of births occur at home in England and Wales.  Our government has pledged to give all women the option of a home birth by the end of this year. At present just 2.7% of births in England and Wales take place at home, but there are considerable regional variations – so we have a huge way to go in achieving this.

Louise Silverton, deputy general secretary of the Royal College of Midwives, said, the study was “a major step forward in showing that home is as safe as hospital, for low risk women giving birth when support services are in place, but she also acknowledged that ” the NHS is simply not set up to meet the potential demand for home births”, she went on to say that there needs to be a major increase in the number of midwives.  My experience fully supports this fact, sadly I am regularly hearing of women being denied a homebirth on the grounds of inadequate staffing – this is outrageous and women need to be campaigning and lobbying for better maternity services (www.aims.org.uk; www.onemotheronemidwife.org.uk; www.kentmidwiferypractice.net)

Further reading

www.nhs.uk/news/2009/04April/Pages/HomeBirthSafe.aspx
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/health/7998417.stm
www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/annalisa-barbieri-i-gave-birth-at-home-ndash-and-heres-why-1669309.html


Twitter